Forgotten Historical Route 66 April 28, 2016

April 28, 2016

As always I admire the wall murals and El Reno didn’t let me down as I caught a few as I was leaving town.

DSC_0134

As I turned toward Route 66 I noticed that the Chisholm Trail is an integral part of my trip now.

DSC_0135 (2)

On the same corner I found this chicken coming out of the wall.DSC_0136

Another historical marker along Route 66 concerning Fort Reno.DSC_0137

I did stop by the old Fort Reno for a photo opportunity.

DSC_0139 (2)

DSC_0140

DSC_0141

DSC_0143 (2)

DSC_0144

Traveling Route 66 brought me to this ¾ mile long pony bridge with 38 pony (small trusses) to span the South Canadian River. Getting here has been fun as the road is a 1933 curbed-concrete road. Going over it reminds me of being in a train with the ‘clippity clop’ of the tires clicking on the expansion joints. Much like the train rolling over the connecting points.

DSC_0173 

Yet another fun roadside historical marker sitting by Lucille’s.

DSC_0147 (2)

DSC_0148 (2)

Weatherford must have a problem as the sign states local traffic only as you enter their downtown area. Maybe the sign is misplaced!

DSC_0149 (2)

DSC_0150 (2)

DSC_0151 (2)

The Cherokee Trading Post is the first I’ve seen in Oklahoma. I stopped to buy another pair of moccasins but they didn’t have anything different than what I already have. So I’ll wait until I get further west for a new pair.

DSC_0153 (2)

I wanted to eat at the White Dog Hill Restaurant but I didn’t trust that I could get out once I got up there. So I didn’t have lunch until later.

DSC_0154 (2)

Clinton, OK has an Oklahoma Route 66 Museum that boasts it is national in scope. The museum covers quite a bit of real-estate with a collection of windmills, village and the museum itself is glass brick with a neon sign.

DSC_0155

DSC_0156 (2)

DSC_0157

DSC_0158

This is an actual piece of the curbed concrete road I’ve been driving on.

DSC_0159

 Other buildings on the museum grounds.

DSC_0164 (2)

DSC_0165

DSC_0166 (2)

DSC_0167 (2)

DSC_0168 (2)I wonder how long it will be before this ’66 Sweet Spot’ is a roadside relic?

DSC_0160 (2)

For much of my trip I’ve been following parallel to a major road, US Route 55, US Route 44 or US Route 40. I do get to pass over the old bridges and see other oddities that those traveling the main roads don’t. Sometimes there are no 66 markers and I have to double back because I’ve missed a turn. If it weren’t for the book ‘EZ66 Route 66 Guide for Travelers’ by Jerry McClanahan I would never have been able to stay on Route 66.

DSC_0171 (2)

DSC_0173

DSC_0174 (2)

DSC_0175 (2)If you’ve ever wondered what the old Route 66 actually looks like I am showing you now. Route 66 was a 4-lane road and only 2 are being used now. I’ve been running beside it all along and some communities in Missouri and Illinois made walking/biking trails out of the unused 2 lanes. But here in Oklahoma in the ‘wide open spaces’ the road has been completely abandoned. It reminds me of a movie set after some apocalyptic event.

DSC_0178

DSC_0179The last watering hole before you leave Oklahoma and enter Texas. I actually had illusions of staying in Texola but there is nothing there!DSC_0180 (2)

DSC_0181A final Oklahoma historical marker.DSC_0182 (2)

DSC_0183

It is indeed a small world. I pulled into a RV Park only to find it closed down and empty. As I was leaving a pickup stopped and I mentioned that the Park appeared closed. The man said he was a broker and was supposed to be meeting the owner to view the property. As we talked he asked me where I was from. I mentioned Indianapolis but that I had grown up in Lovington, NM. He said that Shamrock was home to the Purcell family that had ties to Lovington. As he talked it became apparent that Becky was in my graduating class and he had dated her younger sister Sarah. What a small world.

Shamrock, TX boasts a 1936 Conoco station that has been restored, U-Drop Inn/Tower Conoco!

DSC_0186 (2)

I began to see the posted quips and the resulting Burma Shave signs.

DSC_0187

Another oddity spotted is these welded art items

 DSC_0188

More murals to appreciate.

DSC_0189

DSC_0190

DSC_0193

This was the first Phillips 66 station in Texas. Located in McLean

DSC_0194 (2)

At this point I had to jump on I-40 and stayed the night at an accommodating Texas rest stop because it had a storm shelter.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *